Emre Yücel

Total 6 Posts

FACTS ABOUT THE ARMENIAN INSURRECTION

Note of the translation: This is the English translation of the article by Dr. Omer Lutfi Tascioglu (Dr. Ömer Lütfi TAŞÇIOĞLU in Turkish Alphabet). The title has been modified to notify the reader about the true history of the Armenian Insurrection and Treason during WWI against the Ottoman Empire, and how this is related to the terrorism of the PKK and ethnic separatism and racism today in the region, and how the so-called Armenian Genocide claims are used against the Turkish Republic and Turks.

http://ankaenstitusu.com/ermeni-sorunuyla-ilgili-gercekler/

Original publicaton date: 24 December 2017
________________________________________
FACTS ABOUT THE ARMENIAN QUESTION – link ankaenstitusu.com /ermeni-sorunuyla-ilgili-gercekler/

CATEGORY:

Center for Strategic Studies, Subject-Based Studies, Military History and Strategy,

Center for Strategic Studies, Subject-Based Studies, Education, Individual and Community Awareness,

Center for Strategic Studies, Subject-Based Studies, Global/Regional Influence Struggles, Article,

Center for Strategic Studies, Subject Based Studies, Media and Communication,

Center for Strategic Studies, Subject Based Studies, NGO and Psycho-Social Studies,

Center for Strategic Studies, Geographical Studies, Central Geography, Turkiye,

Center for Strategic Studies, Subject Based Studies, International Organizations

Keywords: Ottoman Empire, Armenian terrorism, PKK, Kurdish terrorism, Armenian terrorism, Armenian treason, Armenian insurgency, World War I, so-called unproven Armenian Genocide, genocide lie, Turkish Massacres in the World War I, Turks massacred, Turkish massacres in Anatolia, Turkish massacres in Caucasus, Russian invasion, Armenian treason, 1915, Turks massacred in Anatolia, Turkish exodus, Turkish migration, Armenian relocation, WWI


When the Ottoman Empire was disintegrating, Ottoman Armenians pursued the same goal to establish an independent Armenia on the pieces they would tear from the Ottoman Empire like the Greeks, Bulgarians, and Serbs. This goal is the most important reason underlying the problems with Armenia today. The factual basis which reveals the Armenian Problem will be revealed with this study, which will disclose Armenian Committees and Revolts, the relocation, the massacres committed by the Armenians against the Turks, and the modern goals by the Armenian ambition.


I. The Armenian Committees and Revolts


The Armenians were called the Tebaa-i Sadıka which can be roughly translated as the ‘loyal people.’ After the 1860s, the Ottoman Armenians started to pursue a goal of establishing an independent Armenian State on the lands to be torn off the Ottoman Empire and started to organize under the name of ‘charitable’ societies such as Hinchak, Dashnak and Ramgavar. [1]. The 1829 Treaty of Edirne led to Greece to become an independent state. Anchoring on the goal of carving out an independent state for themselves, the Ottoman Armenians rebelled during the Ottoman-Russian War of 1828-1829 and then again in 1877-1878, and then again in the WWI, creating mutiny and fighting against the Ottoman Empire, which was the state the Ottoman Armenians were citizens of. While the Ottoman Empire was fighting in 8 different fronts during the World War I, the Armenian rebellions weakened the state. While the Ottoman Armies were fighting on eight different fronts, they were also trying to establish security in the backdrop of the Ottoman Lands because of the mutiny of Ottoman Armenians [2] .

Just before the 1st World War began, the Armenian Committees issued the instructions, summarized below, to the villages [3] :

  1. Every Armenian should be armed by selling even some of her essential needs.
  2. The Armenians, who were called into arms with the mobilization order, will not comply with this call, the Armenian soldiers who have been recruited will desert the army and join the Armenian gangs and volunteer units. [‘Mobilization’ is the declaration of the Ottoman Army, calling able Ottoman citizens, including Ottoman Armenians to army].
  3. As soon as the Russian armies cross the border, the committee members, fugitives and gangs will join the Russian army and attack the Ottoman army within the ranks, interrupting the supply and intelligence of the Ottoman army by cutting the supply lines and telegraph lines.
  4. They will massacre Muslims up to the age of 2 behind the front, wherever they see them and at every opportunity, and they will seize or destroy the food, property and property of the Muslim people.
  5. They will burn the houses, agricultural products, churches and charitable institutions they will leave behind, and make propaganda as if they were Muslims who did all these.
  6. They will set fire to the official government offices, ambush and murder the Ottoman police and gendarmes, and kill the Ottoman soldiers who returned from the front with injuries.
  7. They will rebel and revolt in cities, towns and villages, demoralizing Muslim soldiers and civilians and forcing them to migrate.
  8. They will arm all Armenians by manufacturing, supplying or importing bombs and weapons.
  9. They will blame the Muslims for the rebellion, revolt, and massacres committed by the Armenians, and they will publish their deeds in domestic, and especially foreign, public opinion.
  10. They will spy and guide on behalf of the Entente (Allied Powers) [4].

Armenians under arms in the Ottoman Empire, following the instructions of the committees mentioned above, deserted with their weapons and joined the Russian army, spied on behalf of the enemy armies, and Armenian bakers poisoned the Ottoman soldiers with the bread they made [5]. Most of the Armenians, who could not pass to the Russian side, formed armed gangs and started to revolt and massacre in Turkish villages.


II. Arresting the Members of the Armenian Committees


After the Armenians continued to massacre innocent civilians despite all warnings, the Ottoman Empire took the decision to close the Armenian Committee Centers, to confiscate their documents and to arrest the committee leaders, on April 24, 1915. 19 Mausers, 74 Martini, 111 Winchester, 96 Manliher, 78 Gira, 358 Filovir, 3591 pistols and 45221 ammunition were seized with those arrested.

155 of the arrested committee members were sent to Çankırı, 71 to Ayaş, those sent to Çankırı were not imprisoned but kept under surveillance, and it was obligatory to prove that they did not leave the city by stopping by the police station only once a day. Later, 35 of those in Çankırı were found not guilty and allowed to return to Istanbul, 25 Armenian committee members who were found guilty were sent to Ayaş, 57 committee members were sent to Zor, and 3 of 7 foreign national Armenians were deported. 31 of the left-overs were forgiven, 3 were released after the Armistice of Mudros, and the rest were released after the British occupation of Istanbul [6]. This is the simple state of affairs that the unproven allegation of so-called Armenian Genocide is attributed to with all the brouhaha raised by the Racist Armenians, today.

III. The Decision of Relocation and the Armenians who were ordered to relocate versus those Armenians who were exempt from this decision

After the Armenian committee leaders were arrested, despite all the warnings, the Armenians continued their revolts and massacres, and on 27 May 1915, the Ottoman State enacted the law of relocation of those who rebelled and massacred civilians by forming gangs to provinces such as Damascus and Mosul within the territory of the Ottoman State.

According to the 1914 census conducted by the Ottoman State Ministry of Internal Affairs Registry General Directorate, the number of Armenians living in the entire Ottoman geography was 1,294,851 [7]. The number of Armenians living in the Anatolian lands, where the immigration practice was made, is 736,000 people [8].
Some of them immigrated to other countries of their own accord, some of them converted to Islam in order not to be subject to immigration decision, and the other part was exempted from immigration.

The following Ottoman Armenians were held exempt from relocation; (i) those who do not violate the State Orders, (ii) those who do not violate the safety and security of the Ottoman citizens, (iii) those who do not spy, (iv) Catholic and Protestant Armenians, (v) deputies, (vi) soldiers, (vii) officers, (viii) military doctors, (ix) those who work in labor battalions, (x) officer Armenians working in railways, (xi) workers, (xii) employees, and their families, (xiii) those who work with Turkish families, (xiv) those whose loyalty is not doubted, (xv) those who converted to Islam, (xvi) those Armenians from Istanbul, Bursa, Kütahya, Van and Kars [9]. The number of people exempted from relocation was 204,700 [10], the number of people who converted to Islam in order to avoid relocation was 95,000 [11]. As a result, the number of Anatolian Armenians who were not subjected to immigration is around 300,000.

According to Ottoman archive documents, the number of Armenians subjected to relocation was 438,758 [12], number of Armenians reaching the relocation destinations was 382,148 [13]. 87% of the relocated reached their new habitats safely.

Jackson, the American consul in Aleppo, reported that there were 486,000 Armenians on his list of Armenians relocated, on February 3, 1916 [14]. The aforementioned report also confirms that most of the displaced Armenians reached their places of relocation.

According to Ottoman archive documents, the number of Armenians who lost their lives before they could reach their places of emigration due to bandit attacks, hunger and epidemics was 56,610 [15]. About 25,000-30,000 of them died from diseases such as typhoid fever and dysentery, which caused significant losses to Ottoman soldiers and Ottoman people, too [16]. When we consider that the number of soldiers who died from epidemic diseases in the Ottoman army was 466,759 in the same period [17], the death rate among the Ottoman Armenians due to disease becomes understandable.

Some 9,500-10,000 of the 56,610 Armenians lost their lives due to bandit attacks on the roads. The Ottoman archive documents reveal that 500 people were killed between Erzurum and Erzincan, 2000 people were killed in Meskene between Urfa and Aleppo, 2000 people were killed as a result of the attacks of bandits and urban people around Mardin, and that about 5000 people were killed as a result of attacks on caravans passing through the Dersim region [18]. However, since the Ottoman army was at war, only the Gendarmerie could have accompanied the migration convoys. The bandits attacked and destroyed the Gendarmerie before attacking the migration convoys, then attacked the convoys, and therefore the Ottoman State cannot be blamed for the Armenians who died in the bandit attacks during relocation. This conclusion was also recorded in the official report of the League of Nations [19] . On the other hand, some of those bandits who committed the crimes were caught and were sentenced to punishment after a trial.

It was Talat Paşa (pronounced as Pasha) himself who followed up with the trials of 1397 who were sentenced to various punishments including but not limited to capital punishment as a result of ill-treatment and attacks on the Ottoman Armenians during relocation according to the Military Criminal Tribunals [20] [20]. We must note that there were innocent people such as the Boğazlıyan kaymakamı (district governor of Boghazliyan) Mehmet Kemal Bey, who was hanged until he was dead as a result of the immense pressure of the Armenian Church and the British among those who received punishment [21]. [Emre Yucel’s Note: Mehmet Kemal did not do anything and was innocent of all affairs related to relocation. He had nothing to do with the decision of relocation and was deemed guilty by a kangaroo court of the Ottoman administration at the time].

The Ottoman State transported many of the displaced Armenians by rail, by river boats called ‘şahtur’ (shah-tour) on river routes, by army vehicles in places where there was no railway and waterway, and with oxcarts allocated to each family in cases where no vehicle could be found.

Edward I. Nathan, the Mersin Consulate of the USA, reported in its report dated 30 August 1915 and 11 September 1915 that the Ottoman Empire allocated vehicles and oxcarts to the those during relocation where there was no train [22], reiver vehicles and railways so that the Armenians who relocated could reach their destinations safely. These reports were corroborated by the report of Missionary George E. White, Principal of Merzifon College of the USA [23].

The Ottoman Empire gave a daily wage of 3 kuruş (kouroush) to the elders of the Armenians subject to relocation, 60 para (puh-ruh) to their children, continued the aid after the relocation, such as providing houses with a title on their names, arable land, tools, capital and seeds for the practice of their respective profession in their new habitats [24].

IV. Turkish Massacres by the Armenians

While the statistics of the Armenians were inflated with exaggeration on a daily basis in attacks against the Ottoman Empire and the Turkish Republic, it is remarkable that losses of Turks, mostly women, children, and the elderly, who were massacred by the Armenians, are completely ignored. Armenians massacred women, children and the elderly with severe torture in those regions where they formed gangs of rebellion. Many mass graves belonging to Turks were found in regions where such massacres took place.

The regions where Armenians rebelled, as shown on the map above, are also places where they committed massacres of Turks and Muslims. Here are some examples of these massacres:

IV.1. Zeytun Rebellion (1895) and Massacre

On 14 December 1895, 20 years before the relocation, 6000 Armenians, 4000 of whom were armed, rebelled and captured 600 Turkish prisoners, which included 50 officers and 550 soldiers with the District Governor (Kaymakam) and martyred defenseless Turkish peasants of the region with axes, daggers, and pickaxes, who largely included women and children [25].

The bodies of the murdered Turks remained at the scene of the massacre for a long time, and the bodies of the Turks were thrown from the Crows Bridge into the Zeytun Stream by the rebel Armenians to destroy evidence, just before the Turkish troops reached Zeytun [26]. However, some of the corpses, which were thought to be destroyed by the flow of the stream, were caught on rocks and pieces of ice.

The Catholic priest named Padré Emanuel, who watched the events from the roof of his house, told Barnham, the British Consul in Aleppo, as follows: “The massacre of the Turks took about two hours. The screams and cries of the massacred Turks were terrifying”.

The number of Armenians who died during the Zeytun revolts was 6,000, and the number of Turks who died was 20,000, of which 13,000 were soldiers and 7,000 were civilians [27].

IV.2. Turkish Massacres in Erzurum and Erzincan Region

After the declaration of mobilization [by the Ottoman Empire], most Armenians in the central Erzurum and Bayezid sanjak fled with their own weapons, and those who were under arms joined the Russians, and the Russian Government once again armed and equipped them, and formed special gangs of their own and sent them back inside the border [28]. Organized and armed, “Armenian volunteer regiments” attacked the Ottoman army as the vanguard of the Russian armies [29]. Together with the local gangs, they persecuted and massacred the Ottoman people in the region [30]. It should be noted that a significant part of these mass murders, in which Armenians massacred Turks, as in the Zeytun revolt, were committed before the forced migration decision.

With the preparations that started at the end of 1914, the Armenians took action in 1915 and intensified the massacre, especially with the capture of Erzincan by the Russians as of July 1916.

The Armenian gangs advancing to the east of Erzurum forced the local Armenians, who owned and could handle arms, to join them by transferring the families from all the Armenian villages to Russia, and when they retreated, they destroyed the Muslim villages by burning, destroying, and murdering their people with torture [31].

In the code no. 108 sent to the Commander-in-Chief by the 3rd Army Commander Vehip Pasha on 21 March 1916 [32]; it was reported “ that information was provided on the massacre committed by the Armenians in Erzurum on March 10, 1916, that the enemy (Russians) and especially the Armenian soldiers behaved very cruelly and brutally to the people fleeing the villages exposed to the enemy occupation, and they took the young, children and girls to an unknown place by kidnapping them, that they plundered and murdered their property and lives, that rape was found to an unimaginable level, and the information obtained from other sources confirmed these issues [33].

The Muslim people in Eastern Anatolia and especially in Erzurum region experienced the greatest suffering during the withdrawal of the Russians from the region after the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk.

During this period, the mass graves of Muslims murdered by Armenians in Alaca village were discovered in 1966, and the mass graves of Muslims killed in Yeşilyayla on October 7, 1988. Dr. It was discovered by a delegation headed by Enver Konukçu. It is understood from the marks on their skeletons that most of them were tortured to death [34].

IV.3. Turkish Massacres in Van Region

The appointment of two foreign inspectors as governors in the region called Vilayet-ı sitte in Eastern Anatolia in May 1914 and their taking office in July encouraged the hesitant Armenians in the region and strengthened the opinion among the minorities that the Ottoman Empire was now collapsing.

As a result, in October, Armenian insurgents started to gather in Muş, Van and Bitlis regions to fight against the Ottoman Empire, and no one came to the mobilization call of the Ottoman Empire. The Armenians, who had fled unarmed from the troops in order not to attract attention at first, later started to flee with arms, little by little, and on a regular basis. By forming battalions of 300-400 people each, along with well-known committee members from Erzurum Antranik, Muşlu Sampat, Vanlı Hamazasp and similar gang leaders who crossed from the borders, especially from Van and Muş sides to Russia and Iran, they performed open and regular drills in the Hoy and Dilman region under the direction of Russian officers [35].

Armenian gangs took the opportunity to form an armed force of 40,000 people in Van. After the 33rd Division of Van’s Ottoman Forces left to help the War effort, Armenian armed terrorists started to massacre Turks in Van and its surroundings. In the Armenian armed terrorist insurgency that started in Van on April 15th, first the remaining Gendarmerie force was attacked and completely decimated, and then the Armenian terrorists started to murder remaining Turkish population. Within a month, until the Russian army captured Van on May 18th, Armenian terrorist traitors under the command of Aram, massacred 23,000 Turks.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs explained the destruction and atrocities committed by the Armenians in Van in a circular dated September 16, 1916, which it sent to foreign missions:

In Şamaram district, 200 women and children were burned in the house where they took shelter. The village of Mirkos was raped and plundered even though it was hoisting the white flag, and the women and girls of the village were taken to an unknown direction. In some villages, the meat of the killed children was intended to be fed to their mothers.
Nearly 500 people in Aksani and Hınıs villages, and nearly 200 children and women in Şeyhane village, were forced into the village mosque and burned alive.
The people around the palace were put to the sword, thrown into the waters and drowned, and more than 10,000 bodies were counted on Lake Van.
Again, 3000 people were massacred in Gevaş, Vastan and Mukas…
Mosques, houses, barracks, and even hospitals with the wounded and their patients were burned in Van. The captured officers were tortured and killed. Meanwhile, 1200 people from the surrounding villages who did not know the situation in the city and wanted to come to Van were brutally murdered on the Vastan and Etkil road.” [36].

10,000 Armenian terrorists under the direction of Aram massacred 1200 people in the Vastan and Etkil roads, 3000 in Gevaş, Vastan and Mukas, 200 women and children in Van Şamaram neighborhood, 500 in Aksani and Hınıs villages and 8000 Muslims in the American missionary center [37]. Close to 22,900 people were burned to death by the Armenians, using methods such as rape, torture, and execution.

In order to escape the Armenian massacre, the surviving Turks of Van left the city on 14 May and started to flee in the direction of Bitlis, and some of them were massacred by Armenian gangs on the way [38].

All the mosques of Van were destroyed, Turkish neighborhoods were burned, and Van and its surroundings were turned into a smoldering fireplace. About 80 patients who could not be transported from the Van hospital to another place were burned alive by the Armenians [39].

In the province of Van, where there were 3400 Muslim houses before the war, the number of houses that the Armenians did not destroy or set on fire after the war is only three [40]. All 6500 houses belonging to Muslims in Bitlis were burned and demolished by Armenians [41].

In the massacre committed by Armenians in Van, which constitutes one of the most important reasons for the relocation, the number of civilian Turks killed within a month is 22,900. The number of Turks and Muslims killed by Armenians in Van and its 4 districts between 1914-1919 is 217,105 [42].

The total number of Turks massacred by Armenians, some examples of which are given above, is stated as 518,105 in documents No. 49 [43] and 50 [44] according to the Prime Ministry General Directorate of State Archives, Department of Ottoman Archives. However, this number is calculated by combining the place, time, place, perpetrator and victims of the incident, and the massacres determined by the style of the incident. When the number of people killed in other massacres by Armenians (which did not include the names of the murderer and the victim), is added to this figure, the Turkish losses reach 2 million people.

IV.4. Turks massacred in Anatolia while fleeing the Armenians

According to research by Prof. Dr. Justin McCarthy, 18% (2,500,000) of the Muslim population in Anatolia died between 1912 and 1922. The number of Turks killed only in the eastern provinces of Turkiye is 1,189,132 people [45].

In addition to the massacre in Turkiye, 413,000 Turks and Muslims were massacred in the regions of Baku, Ganja, Tbilisi, Kutaisi, Kars and Revan (Yerevan) in the Trans Caucasus. When the 1,189,132 people killed in the Anatolian geography between 1912-1922 are added to the 413,000 people killed in the Trans Caucasus, the number of Turks and Muslims killed reaches 1,602,132 [46].

When 518,105 Turks, who were massacred by Armenians in their regions and whose identity information and ways of slaughtering were given in detail in Ottoman documents, were added to the numbers above, the total reaches 1,931,105 Turks massacred by Armenians in Anatolia and the Caucasus.

On the other hand, in addition to the massacred Turks, a significant part of the Turkish population of the region had to leave their lands in order to escape the massacre and became refugees. The number of Turks immigrating from the provinces under the Russian invasion is 1,604,031, and about 1,000,000 of them lost their lives on the roads due to Armenian attacks, hunger, thirst, and disease [47].

As a matter of fact, Bruce Fein, legal adviser to former US President Reagan, suggested that it would be wrong to present the relocation as genocide and the real victims here are Turks by his statement; “The White House conducted research in 1981, it was revealed that Armenians massacred over 2 million Turks. When we add the Turks who had to migrate from their lands to escape the occupation and escape the massacre, the loss of Turks in the 1st World War reaches 2,400,000 people. Armenians do not open their own archives because they do not want this truth to be revealed [48]”.

On the other hand, when the situation of the massacred Turks is compared with the situation of the Armenians who lost their lives during the relocation, it is revealed that a large part of the Armenians died due to epidemic diseases and road conditions, while the Turks and Muslims killed by the Armenians were murdered under severe torture [49].

IV.5. Collaboration of Armenians with the PKK

When the events that took place in 1915 are examined in the light of the evidence provided above, it is better understood that the massacre of Turks and Muslims, which the Armenians started in the 1890s to establish an independent Armenia in the Ottoman geography, could be considered a genocide committed against the Turks, and could not be considered as ill-intent against defenseless Armenians as a result of and during relocation. However, when the Armenians plan to establish an Armenian State by changing the demographic structure of the region fell through because of relocation, Armenians are trying to avenge their expulsion from Turkish lands with unproven allegations of so-called Armenian Genocide. In fact, the event is not limited to revenge. A significant part of the territory of the Republic of Turkiye, including the 19 provinces of Eastern and Southeastern Anatolia, is shown as the territory of Armenia under the name of Western Armenia in the Armenian Constitution. An important point to note in this regard is that the lands that the PKK and the Armenians want to detach from the Republic of Turkiye overlap to a large extent, as can be clearly seen when the maps below are compared. In 1987, an agreement was made between the separatist terrorist organization PKK and Armenians. In the said agreement; it was decided that the Armenians would be involved in training activities within the PKK terrorist organization, that the PKK terrorist organization would be paid 5,000 USD per year for each person it would train, and that the trained Armenians would participate in small-scale actions. In this agreement, the following decisions were made in the meeting held on April 18, 1990, with the person named Hermez Samurouyan, who was responsible for PKK-ASALA relations, upon the Armenians’ prominence within the organization:

  1. PKK and ASALA terrorist organizations will now be jointly managed.
  2. In the actions to be taken against the security forces in Turkiye, the Armenians will provide intelligence, and actions will be carried out in the metropolitan cities of Turkiye.
  3. The lands acquired after the possible revolution will be divided equally between the Armenians and the Kurds.
  4. 75% of camp expenses will be covered by Armenians [50].

On 4 June 1993; Another meeting was held at the PKK terrorist organization headquarters in West Beirut with the participation of members of the Armenian Hinchak Party, ASALA and PKK terrorist organization, and the previous decisions were repeated.

Another striking example of the Armenian-PKK relationship is the following statements used in the meetings held in two separate churches in Beirut on January 6-9, 1993, attended by the Lebanese Armenian Orthodox Archbishop, Armenian Party officials, and 150 young people:

“For now, a calm attitude should be shown towards Turkiye. The Armenian community is growing and getting stronger economically. Thanks to the propaganda activities developed, the genocide has become better known all over the world. The Armenian state has been established, its lands are expanding day by day, and they will definitely avenge their ancestors one day. Other western countries, especially the USA, find the Armenians justified in the ongoing war in Karabakh. You should seize this opportunity. New ones will join the Armenian youth fighting in Karabakh. The civil war will continue in Turkiye (meaning the fight against the PKK terrorist organization), the Turkish economy will come to zero and the citizens will revolt. Turkiye will be divided, and a Kurdish state will be established. Armenians should maintain good relations with the Kurds and support their struggle. The lands that are in the hands of the Turks today will belong to the Armenians tomorrow” [51].

On the other hand, it has been observed that the cooperation between the separatist elements who want to establish a Kurdistan in Turkiye and the Armenians has been getting stronger in recent years. In this context, successive meetings are made between the BDP and HDP and the Armenian Dashnak Party [52] and as a result of these meetings; it is stated that “in addition to researching the possibilities of Armenian-Kurdish cooperation on Western Armenia and the lands of Kurdistan, [53] other cooperation issues between the two nations are discussed” [54].

The following recent developments are noteworthy in pointing out to the collaboration between Armenians and the PKK terrorist organizations: (1) Replacing street names and direction signs in Sur District of Diyarbakır [55] and Edremit District of Van with signs printed in Armenian and Kurdish [56]. (2) In the 4-day war between Armenia and Azerbaijan in April 2016, the PKK sent an Armenian named Sisliyan to Karabakh to fight against the Azerbaijani army as a commander [57]. (3) It turned out that some of the PKK members, who were captured dead in Diyarbakır’s Sur district, were commandos in the Armenian army [58].

In addition to the activities in question, some Turkish citizens of Armenian origin with Turkish names and surnames were invited to Armenia and sent back to Turkiye after being taught in Armenian, and upon their return they made statements accusing Turkiye of genocide and claiming that Eastern Anatolia is Armenian territory [59] [59]. It shows the extent of the danger. These developments show that the Armenian problem has become a problem of survival for Turkiye along with the problem of ethnic separatism.

Conclusion

The evidence presented above determines that the Armenian Insurrection during the Great War and the relocation caused Turks to be extracted from their homelands to escape from the invading armies of the Imperialist Russia and massacres committed by Armenians, and that the number of Turks massacred in Anatolia and the Caucasus reached 2 million. However, the loss of life and suffering of the Turks due to the Armenian massacres is not emphasized enough and is not known by the grandchildren of the deceased. On the other hand, the vast majority of Armenians, some of whom converted to Islam in order to avoid relocation in 1915, remain loyal to their homeland, but some of them, taking advantage of the concealment opportunity provided by the Turkish name and surname, accuse the Turks of committing genocide against the Armenians by making false documents and allegations every day. Our silence on this issue causes comments in the domestic and foreign public opinion that the Turks admit their guilt, and even the newly-grown Turkish youth begin to believe in the lie that the Turks committed genocide against the Armenians.[Translator’s note: There is no legal precedent or decision by a competent and independent court that determined the unproven so-called Armenian Genocide occurred].

Accusing Turks although Turks are victims by trying to corner them with the lie of genocide, and Armenia’s cooperation with the PKK in an attempt to divide Turkiye makes it necessary to change the defense strategy implemented by the Republic of Turkiye so far in the Armenian treason. History will give its verdict sooner or later. But History doesn’t write itself. Those who write the Truth must make as well an effort as those who write history with false documents. In this context, it is an important responsibility of Turkish intellectuals to focus on research and studies that will reveal the situation of the Turks who had to leave their lands due to the Armenian massacres, the Turkish losses in the First World War, and the Armenian-PKK cooperation.

SOURCES

1. ARCHIVAL DOCUMENTS
1.1. Ottoman Archives:
1.1.1. Prime Ministry Ottoman Archives, Ministry of Internal Affairs, General Directorate of Security, 2nd Branch Archive (Başbakanlık Osmanlı Arşivi Dahiliye Nezareti Emniyet Umum Müdürlüğü 2. Şube Arşivi) 68/71, 68/80-83-84, 68/81, 68/101, 57/110
1.1.2. Prime Ministry Ottoman Archives Ministry of Internal Affairs Code Undersecretary (Başbakanlık Osmanlı Arşivi Dahiliye Nezareti Şifre Kalemi): No. 57/51, 57/71, 59/244, 56/140, 55-A/144, 54/406, 54-A/73, 54-A/228, 54-A/248
1.1.3. Political Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Prime Ministry Ottoman Archives (Başbakanlık Osmanlı Arşivi Hariciye Nezareti Siyasi Kısmı): Cardboard-Box (Karton):110, Folder (Dosya): 12–2, No: 56–62
1.1.4. Prime Ministry Ottoman Archives, Political Section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Treasury Documents, Cardboard (Başbakanlık Osmanlı Arşivi Hariciye Nezareti Siyasi Kısmı, Hazine-i Evrak, Karton) 178, Folder (Dosya):23
1.1.5. Prime Ministry Ottoman Archives Foreign Ministry Political Section Treasury Documents Directorate (Başbakanlık Osmanlı Arşivi Hariciye Nezareti Siyasi Kısmı Hazine-i Evrak Müdürlüğü )K. 110, Folder (Dosya) : 12, No: 8702962
1.1.6. Prime Ministry General Directorate of State Archives Department of Ottoman Archives Publication (Başbakanlık Devlet Arşivleri Genel Müdürlüğü Osmanlı Arşivi Daire Başkanlığı Yayın) No: 49, Documents of Massacre by Armenians (Ermeniler Tarafından Yapılan Katliam Belgeleri) (1914-1919), Ankara, 2001
1.1.7. Prime Ministry General Directorate of State Archives Department of Ottoman Archives Publication (Başbakanlık Devlet Arşivleri Genel Müdürlüğü Osmanlı Arşivi Daire Başkanlığı Yayın) No: 50, Documents of Massacre by Armenians (Ermeniler Tarafından Yapılan Katliam Belgeleri), Ankara, 2001
1.2. Archives of the General Staff (Genelkurmay Arşivi):
1.2.1. Genelkurmay ATASE Arşivi, No:1/2, Klasör 528, Dosya, 2061, Fihrist 21, No: 4/3671, Klasör 2811, Dosya 26, Fihrist 28, No: 1/131, Klasör 2703, Dosya 308, Fihrist 23-1, No: 4/3671, Klasör 2818, Dosya 59, Fihrist 2-25
1.2.2. Armenian Activities with Archival Documents (Arşiv Belgeleriyle Ermeni faaliyetleri) (1914-1918) Volume (Cilt) 1, Genelkurmay ATASE Başkanlığı Yayınları, Ankara, 2005
1.2.3. Genelkurmay ATASE Arşivi, Cilt II, Koleksiyon: BDH, Klasör:528, Dosya: 2063, Fihrist: 1

2. League of Nations (Cemiyet-i Akvam) Official Documents Resmî Gazetesi, 21.9.1929

3. US Archives
3.1. US Archives NARA 867.48/271: Ek 310
3.2. US Archives NARA 867.4016/193, Copy No: 484

4. BOOKS AND ARTICLES
4.1. Akçora, Ergünöz Van ve Çevresinde Ermeni İsyanları (1896-1916), Türk Dünyası Araştırmaları Vakfı, İstanbul, 1994
4.2. ARF Attends Washington Kurdish Conference, The Armenian Weekly, October 29, 2013
4.3. Ata, Ferudun, “İşgal İstanbul’unda Tehcir Yargılamaları, Atatürk Kültür, Dil ve Tarih Yüksek Kurumu Türk Tarih Kurumu Yayınları, Ankara, 2005
4.4. AYF Participates In First BDP Youth Congress In Diyarbakir, The Armenian Weekly, December 2, 2013
4.5. Bedrosyan, Raffi, “Project Rebirth: Homecoming of Hidden Armenians”, The Armenian Weekly, August 11, 2015
4.6. Çiçek, Kemal, “Ermenilerin Zorunlu Göçü 1915-1917”, Türk Tarih Kurumu Yayınları, Ankara, 2005
4.7. Ermeni Komitelerinin Amaçları ve İhtilal Hareketleri, Genelkurmay Askeri Tarih ve Stratejik Etütler Başkanlığı Yayınları, Ankara 2003
4.8. Fein, Bruce , “Lies, Damn Lies And Armenian Deaths”, Huffpost World, June 4, 2009
4.9. Halaçoğlu, Yusuf, “Ermeni Tehciri ve Gerçekler (1914-1918)”, Türk Tarih Kurumu Yayınları Sayı 90, Ankara
4.10. Karpat, Kemal, Osmanlı Nüfusu (1880-1914) Demografik ve Sosyal Özellikleri, İstanbul, 2003
4.11. Konukçu, Enver, Ermenilerin Yeşilyayla’daki Türk Soykırımı, Atatürk Üniversitesi Rektörlüğü Yayını No: 674, Ankara, 1990
4.12. McCarthy, Justin, Ölüm ve Sürgün, Çeviren: Bilge Umar, İstanbul, 1998
4.13. PKK’dan Ermenistan’a Takviye Kuvvet, Güneş, 24.04.2016
4.14. Tuncay Öğün, “Unutulmuş Bir Göç Trajedisi Vilayat-ı Şarkiye Mültecileri (1915-1923)”, Babil Yayıncılık, Ankara, 2004
4.15. Özdemir Hikmet; Çiçek Kemal; Turan Ömer; Çalık Ramazan; Halaçoğlu Yusuf, Ermeniler: Sürgün ve Göç, Türk Tarih Kurumu yayınları, Ankara, 2004
4.16. Özdemir, Hikmet “Seferberlik İlanından Rus İşgaline Kadar Ermeni Milislerle Çatışmalar”, Gazi Üniversitesi Atatürk İlkeleri ve İnkılâp Tarihi Araştırma ve Uygulama Merkezi, Ankara, Türk-Ermeni İlişkilerinin Gelişimi ve 1915 Olayları Uluslararası Sempozyumu Bildirileri, Ankara, 2006
4.17. Sarınay, Yusuf, “What Happened on April 24, 1915”; The Circular of April 24, 1915, and the Arrest of Armenian Committee Members in Istanbul, Int. Turkish Studies Vol 14, Nos.1&2, 2008
4.18. Sonyel, Salahi Ramsdam, “The Ottoman Armenians, Victims of Great Power Diplomacy”, Oxford University Press, Lefkoşa, Northern Cyprus, 1987
4.19. Süslü, Azmi, Ermeniler ve 1915 Tehcir Olayı, Yüzüncü Yıl Üniversitesi Rektörlüğü Yayın No:5, Ankara, 1990
4.20. Süslü Azmi; Öğün Gülay; Serdar Törehan, Van, Bitlis, Muş ve Kars’taki Ermeni Katliamları, Gazilerle Mülakat, Van 100. Yıl Üniversitesi Yayınları No:8, Ankara, 1994
4.21. Taşcıoğlu, Ömer Lütfi, Türk-Ermeni İlişkilerindeki Tarihsel Gerçekler, Talat Paşa Komitesi Yayın No:1, Ankara, 2015
4.22. Taşcıoğlu, Ömer Lütfi, Türk-Ermeni İlişkilerinde Tarihi, Siyasi ve Hukuki Gerçekler, Nobel Akademik yayınları, Ankara, 2015
4.23. Uras, Esat, “Tarihte Ermeniler ve Ermeni Meselesi”, Türkiye Matbaacılık ve Gazetecilik A.O., Belge Yayınları, İstanbul, 1987
4.24. White, E. George, Bir Amerikan Misyonerinin Merzifon Amerikan Koleji Hatıraları, Çev. Cem Tarık Yüksel, Enderun Yayınları: 46, İstanbul 1995

5. NEWSPAPERS AND INTERNET SOURCES
5.1. Aslan Ferit /Diyarbakır(DHA), “Çok Dilli’ Tabela Sorguda”, 04. 07. 201
5.2. Bekleyen Osman /Van (DHA), “İlçenin İsmi Tabelaya Ermenice Yazıldı”, 24.07.2014
5.3. BDP, ARF Hold High-Level Meeting in Istanbul, The Armenian Weekly, November 12,2013
5.4. Müslüman Muhacirler, Tasvir-i Efkȃr, 11 Mayıs 1919
5.5. Öldürülen PKK’lılar Ermenistan Komandoları Çıktı, Yeniçağ, 10.04.2016
5.6. Ermeni Sorunu, İddialar, Gerçekler, PKK_Ermeniİşbirliği, Erişim:11.02.2011 http://www.Ermenisorunu.gen.tr/turkce /teror /pkk.html

References
1. ERMENI Komitelerinin Amaçları ve İhtilal Hareketleri. Ankara: Genelkurmay Askeri Tarih ve Stratejik Etütler Başkanlığı Yayınları, 2003. s.10-11-36 p.
2. TAşCıOğLU, Ö. L. Türk-Ermeni İlişkilerindeki Tarihsel Gerçekler. Ankara,: Talat Paşa Komitesi Yayın No:1, , v. 5, 2015.
3. SÜSLÜ, A. Ermeniler ve 1915 Tehcir Olayı. No:5, . ed. Ankara: Yüzüncü Yıl Üniversitesi Rektörlüğü Yayın, v. s.103-104, 1990.
4. Genelkurmay ATASE Arşivi, No:1/2, Klasör 528, Dosya, 2061, Fihrist 21, No: 4/3671, Klasör 2811, Dosya 26, Fihrist 28, No: 1/131, Klasör 2703, Dosya 308, Fihrist 23-1, No: 4/3671, Klasör 2818, Dosya 59, Fihrist 2-25. [S.l.].
5. Ermeni Komitelerinin Amaçları ve İhtilal Hareketleri, Genelkurmay Askeri Tarih ve Stratejik Etütler Başkanlığı Yayınları, Ankara 2003, s. 164. [S.l.].
6. Yusuf Sarınay, What Happened on April 24, 1915; The Circular of April 24, 1915, and the Arrest of Armenian Committee Members in Istanbul, Int. Turkish Studies Vol 14, Nos.1&2, 2008, s.78. [S.l.].
7. Esat Uras, Tarihte Ermeniler ve Ermeni Meselesi, Türkiye Matbaacılık ve Gazetecilik A.O., Belge Yayınları, İstanbul, 1987, s.136-145. [S.l.].
8. Hikmet Özdemir, Kemal Çiçek, Ömer Turan, Ramazan Çalık, Yusuf Halaçoğlu, Ermeniler: Sürgün ve Göç, Türk Tarih Kurumu yayınları, Ankara, 2004, s. 36-37; Kemal Karpat, Osmanlı Nüfusu (1880-1914) Demografik ve Sosyal Özellikleri, İstanbul, 2003, s.226-227. [S.l.].
9. Süslü, age, s.149-150; Yusuf Halaçoğlu, Ermeni Tehciri ve Gerçekler (1914-1918)”, Türk Tarih Kurumu Yayınları Sayı 90, Ankara, s. 62-63. [S.l.].
10. Özdemir vd, age, s.94. [S.l.].
11. Kemal Çiçek, Ermenilerin Zorunlu Göçü 1915-1917, Türk Tarih Kurumu Yayınları, Ankara, 2005, s. 253. [S.l.].
12. Yusuf Halaçoğlu, Ermeni Tehciri ve Gerçekler (1914-1918)”, Türk Tarih Kurumu Yayınları Sayı 90, Ankara, s. 72-77; Dahiliye Nezareti Emniyet Umum Müdürlüğü 2. Şube Arşivi 68/71, 68/80-83-84, 68/101, 57/110. [S.l.].
13. Yusuf Halaçoğlu, age, Ankara, s. 72-77; Dahiliye Nezareti Emniyet Umum Müdürlüğü 2. Şube Arşivi 68/71, 68/80-83-84, 68/101, 57/110. [S.l.].
14. Hikmet Özdemir, vd., age, s 75; US Archives NARA 867.48/271: Ek 310. [S.l.].
15. Yusuf Halaçoğlu, age, s. 77. [S.l.].
16. Halaçoğlu, Ermeni Tehciri ve Gerçekler, age, s. 77; Dahiliye Nezareti, Emniyet Umum Müdürlüğü 2.Şube, No: 68/81. [S.l.].
17. Özdemir vd, age, s.252-253. [S.l.].
18. Halaçoğlu, Ermeni Tehciri ve Gerçekler, age, s. 77; Dahiliye Nezareti Şifre Kalemi: No. 57/51, 57/71, 59/244, 56/140, 55-A/144, 54/406, 54-A/73, 54-A/248. [S.l.].
19. League of Nations (Cemiyet-i Akvam) Resmî Gazetesi, 21.9.1929. [S.l.].
20. Azmi Süslü, Ermeniler ve 1915 Tehcir Olayı, Yüzüncü Yıl Üniversitesi Rektörlüğü Yayın No:5, Ankara, s.149-150; Hariciye Nezareti Arşivi Siyasi Kısmı, Hazine-i Evrak, Karton 178, Dosya:23. [S.l.].
21. Ferudun Ata, “İşgal İstanbul’unda Tehcir Yargılamaları, Atatürk Kültür, Dil ve Tarih Yüksek Kurumu Türk Tarih Kurumu Yayınları, Ankara, 2005, s. 290. [S.l.].
22. US Archives NARA 867.4016/193, Copy No: 484. [S.l.].
23. E. George White, Bir Amerikan Misyonerinin Merzifon Amerikan Koleji Hatıraları, Çev. Cem Tarık Yüksel, Enderun Yayınları: 46, İstanbul 1995, s. 217. [S.l.].
24. Halaçoğlu, Ermeni Tehciri ve Gerçekler, age, s. 67-68; Dahiliye Nezareti Şifre Kalemi: No. 54-A/226. [S.l.].
25. Salahi Ramadam Sonyel, “The Ottoman Armenians, Victims of Great Power Diplomacy”, Oxford University Press, Lefkoşa, Northern Cyprus, 1987s. 195. [S.l.].
26. Sonyel, age, s. 196. [S.l.].
27. Sonyel, age, s. 197. [S.l.].
28. Ermeni Komitelerinin Amaçları…, age, s.152. [S.l.].
29. Süslü, Ermeniler ve 1915 Tehcir Olayı…, age, s.85. [S.l.].
30. Ömer Lütfi Taşcıoğlu, Türk-Ermeni İlişkilerinde Tarihi, Siyasi ve Hukuki Gerçekler, Nobel Akademik Yayınları, Ankara, 2015, s. 127-129. [S.l.].
31. Arşiv Belgeleriyle Ermeni faaliyetleri (1914-1918) Cilt 1, Genelkurmay ATASE Başkanlığı Yayınları, Ankara, 2005, s. 102. [S.l.].
32. Hikmet Özdemir, “Seferberlik İlanından Rus İşgaline Kadar Ermeni Milislerle Çatışmalar”, Gazi Üniversitesi Atatürk İlkeleri ve İnkılâp Tarihi Araştırma ve Uygulama Merkezi, Ankara, Türk-Ermeni İlişkilerinin Gelişimi ve 1915 Olayları Uluslararası Sempozyum. [S.l.].
33. Genelkurmay ATASE Arşivi, Cilt II, Koleksiyon: BDH, Klasör:528, Dosya: 2063, Fihrist: 1. [S.l.].
34. Enver Konukçu, Ermenilerin Yeşilyayla’daki Türk Soykırımı, Atatürk Üniversitesi Rektörlüğü Yayını No: 674, Ankara, 1990, s.13-102. [S.l.].
35. Ermeni Komitelerinin Amaçları… age, s.170. [S.l.].
36. Hazine-i Evrak Müdürlüğü K. 110, Dosya: 12, No. 8702962, Ergünöz Akçora, Van ve Çevresinde Ermeni İsyanları (1896-1916), Türk Dünyası Araştırmaları Vakfı, İstanbul, 1994, s.123-127; Azmi Süslü, Gülay Öğün, Törehan Serdar, Van, Bitlis, Muş ve Kars’taki Erm. [S.l.].
37. Başbakanlık Osmanlı Arşivi (BOA). HR. SYS. HU), kr.110, Dosya: 12–2, No: 56–62. [S.l.].
38. Justin McCarthy, Ölüm ve Sürgün, Çeviren: Bilge Umar, İstanbul, 1998, s. 210. [S.l.].
39. Ermeni Komitelerinin Amaçları… age, s. 5-10. [S.l.].
40. McCarthy, age, s.270. [S.l.].
41. McCarthy, age, s.270. [S.l.].
42. Başbakanlık Devlet Arşivleri Genel Müdürlüğü Osmanlı Arşivi Daire Başkanlığı Yayın No: 49, Ermeniler Tarafından Yapılan Katliam Belgeleri (1914-1919), Ankara, 2001, s.377, Yayın No:50, s.1053-1054. [S.l.].
43. Age, s. 377. [S.l.].
44. Başbakanlık Devlet Arşivleri Genel Müdürlüğü Osmanlı Arşivi Daire Başkanlığı Yayın No: 50, Ermeniler Tarafından Yapılan Katliam Belgeleri (1914-1919), Ankara, 2001, s. 1053-1054. [S.l.].
45. Justin McCarthy, “Ölüm ve Sürgün”, Çeviren: Bilge Umar, İnkılap Yayınları, Ankara, 1995, s. 273. [S.l.].
46. McCarthy, “Ölüm ve Sürgün”, age, s. 265. [S.l.].
47. Tuncay Öğün, “Unutulmuş Bir Göç Trajedisi Vilayat-ı Şarkiye Mültecileri (1915-1923)”, Babil Yayıncılık, Ankara, 2004, s. 37; “Müslüman Muhacirler”, Tasvir-i Efkȃr, 11 Mayıs 1919, s. 2. [S.l.].
48. Bruce Fein, “Lies, Damn Lies And Armenian Deaths”, Huffpost World, June 4, 2009. [S.l.].
49. Enver Konukçu, “Ermenilerin Yeşilyayla’daki Türk Soykırımı (11-12 Mart 1918)”, Atatürk Üniversitesi Rektörlüğü Yayını No: 674, Ankara, 1990, s.18-26- 54-57-68-91-93. [S.l.].
50. Ömer Lütfi Taşcıoğlu, “Türk-Ermeni İlişkilerinde Tarihi, Siyasi ve Hukuki Gerçekler”, Nobel Akademik Yayınları, Ankara, 2015, s. 316; Ermeni Sorunu, İddialar, Gerçekler, PKK_Ermeniİşbirliği, http://www.Ermenisorunu.gen.tr/turkce /teror /pkk.html, Erişim:1. [S.l.].
51. Ermeni Sorunu, İddialar, Gerçekler, PKK_Ermeniİşbirliği, http://www.Ermenisorunu.gen.tr/turkce/ teror /pkk.html, Erişim:11.02.2011. [S.l.].
52. ARF Attends Washington Kurdish Conference, The Armenian Weekly, October 29, 2013. [S.l.].
53. BDP, ARF Hold High-Level Meeting in Istanbul, The Armenian Weekly, November 12, 2013. [S.l.].
54. AYF Participates In First BDP Youth Congress In Diyarbakir, The Armenian Weekly, December 2, 2013. [S.l.].
55. Ferit Aslan/Diyarbakır(DHA), “Çok Dilli’ Tabela Sorguda”, 04. 07. 2012. [S.l.].
56. Osman Bekleyen/Van (DHA), “İlçenin İsmi Tabelaya Ermenice Yazıldı”, 24.07.2014. [S.l.].
57. PKK’dan Ermenistan’a Takviye Kuvvet, Güneş, 24.04.2016. [S.l.].
58. Öldürülen PKK’lılar Ermenistan Komandoları Çıktı, Yeniçağ, 10.04.2016. [S.l.].
59. Raffi Bedrosyan, “Project Rebirth: Homecoming of Hidden Armenians”, The Armenian Weekly, August 11, 2015. [S.l.].